AUTHOR INTERVIEW W/ CHILD-X

Christ @IAMKEWALNAM about his latest project #theblackbook, a tragic love story that reveals the plight of african-americans in society. Dark, intriguing, introspective, and a tone of a lifetime. 

Child-X & Kewalnam Christ

February 17, 2015 — 09:00PM

1. When were you called to writing

A: I started writing at the age of 3, my mother would make me read her the mail, letters from school, etc… she was a big influence on my love for literature. Actually, now that I think about it she’s the reason I found my medium as an author. Along with the Barney sing along tapes. And the movie that made me fall in love with literature is “The Page Master.” 

2. Why did you choose this type of medium for expression? How does it differ than anything else you've tried? 

A: Do you really choose yourself? Do you really choose to be who you are? Or do you grow to accept it? I’m not sure if I ever choose to be a writer, probably in my ethereal existence before I incarnated in this lifetime. But I believe that I AM literature, you know? There’s no separation, and because I learned that, because I’ve accepted that, my literature has evolved to a new level. That’s where we find our true talents, in the acceptance of who we are. Now that I identify words as sounds and visuals, I write through those polarities creating stories from frequencies and visuals. That’s what makes me unique, I’m not your average author, I hear words differently, they process differently surging through my mind. There are producers who see sounds as colors. I’m the author, who sees and hears words as sounds.

3. Describe your writing ability with one name. 

A: Kanye.

4. Red pill or blue pill? How do you feel about this realm? 

A: First off, red pill always. And my feelings about this realm… sigh let me start here, I believe that a lot of our problems in this realm are caused out of the imbalance in our male and female energies. We have males who deny the feminine energy in themselves, in-turn suppressing it in others, oppression against our women, etc... When that happens the female energy responds becoming more aggressive, and erratic and that’s where we are today. And this imbalance isn’t restricted to gender, these energies are alive in everything and everyone living. This understanding could be applied to our current stand with racism in this country. There’s this genuine love for our culture that white America has, and hates, so much that they try to find any possible way of suppressing it externally. But your love for it seeps through your veins, we see it in your mannerisms, in how you dress yourself, how you assert yourself… White America your zipper is down. But to play devil’s advocate, if you let me…

You know people argue that white America copies our culture, but do they really? Cause I don’t remember Street shit and rachetivity being “ours”. So what are they copying? What are they imitating? And where are they getting these images from? It comes from that love for something you don’t understand, and you hate yourself for it. But you can’t deny your love for it, so you're stuck, you don’t know why you hate it, you just feel separated from something you actually have a love for. You know, I think it’s ignorant for us in 2015 to preach this, “Fuck Whitey” mentality to our generation and younger, we're regressing as a person by doing that. And I understand the emotional place we're at, in light of the destruction brought to our people. But here is my unpopular opinion, how can we expect others to have a respect for our lives when we don’t? How many times did Twitter activist get together when gang shootouts took the lives of babies, women, men. Where was the activism, for our black women, who face partner violence, and state violence. They are beaten at the hands of our black men, before a white officer puts his hands on her, yet we’re quiet? We are one people, one beautiful being, Gods incarnated in the physical to understand a human experience, not just Blacks, or Asians, ALL PEOPLE. I don’t care about race, I’m aware of the factor it plays, but I don’t care for it.

My goal as a writer is to objectively document the current state of our realm, along with the freedom of imagination and deliver a product that details the polarity were in. So everyday I sit and face my Mac, before I begin writing, I’m faced with the same burning question, you started off with. Red Pill or Blue?

5. What's a common theme or symbol you find yourself attracted to heavily? Why do you think you keep returning to that, is there any subconscious meaning behind it? 

A: I’m attracted to anything that evolves us as a people, so all my art revolves around that, love is the center of my attention. 

6. What are at least three influences for "The Black Book"? 

A: American Psycho,Yeezus, and Lars Von Trier films.

7. Give me 10 abstract bullet points that represent you. It can be an equation, a picture, a hieroglyph. Anything. 

A: The things that influence me vary from Hip-hop, Spirit science, The Roc-A-Fella era to our ethereal connection to the cosmos, Quantum physics, Sacred geometry, Love, women, Sex, fabrics. 

8. What's one thing you want everyone to know, a poem you wrote, a concept that has been burning your brain, as if it were the last message you had here on earth? 

A: I love you.

Via: Child-X

 

The Bearded Hero.

  You know what they say: with great beard comes great responsibility. And Hero: Rick Rubin has one great beard. So far, we think he’s living up to the responsibility. Known for his revolutionary role in the music biz, signature grizzly grey beard, and dark glasses, Fredrick “Rick” Rubin is the elusive spirit responsible for the most influential records and artists of our time. Before landing a spot on the list of “Time Magazine’s 100 Most Influential People In The World” and transforming the music industry, Rubin was just a boy from Long Island who believed in magic—music magic. As a teen, he fronted his own garage band, and even got thrown out of the legendary CBGB’s for fighting with an audience member during one of his shows. Okay, so that audience member was actually somebody he paid to cause a scene, and the cop that threw him out was actually his father acting as a cop, and the whole fight turned out to be staged in order to build a buzz about the band, but still. That’s vision. After borrowing $5,000 from his parents, Rubin started Def Jam Records in his NYU dorm room alongside Russell Simmons. It was in that exact room that Rubin produced chart-topping albums such as the Beastie Boys “Licensed To Ill” and gave LL Cool J his first radio hit. After parting ways with Simmons and Def Jam, Rubin founded Def American Recordings. However, after realizing that the term “Def” was becoming too mainstream he changed the name to American Recordings. He even held a traditional funeral for the nixed term, with a eulogy performed by Reverend Al Sharpton. The former co-president of Columbia records is responsible for helping revive Johnny Cash’s career with the album “Unchained” and even helped Andrew Dice Clay drop his first comedy album. Rubin, who admittedly has no technical skills and does not know how to work a soundboard, bases his success on the fact that he listens to the music as a fan. He’s even lent his talented ear to artists like Adele, The Dixie Chicks, Jay-Z, and The Red Hot Chili Peppers, producing hit after hit. Although Rubin rarely mingles with the media and prefers to stay behind the scenes, you can catch a glimpse of him and his infamous facial hair on screen in Jay-Z’s “99 Problems” video. Clearly, if Rubin does have 99 problems, a beard ain’t one. HeadlinesandHeroes 

 

You know what they say: with great beard comes great responsibility. And Hero: Rick Rubin has one great beard. So far, we think he’s living up to the responsibility. Known for his revolutionary role in the music biz, signature grizzly grey beard, and dark glasses, Fredrick “Rick” Rubin is the elusive spirit responsible for the most influential records and artists of our time. Before landing a spot on the list of “Time Magazine’s 100 Most Influential People In The World” and transforming the music industry, Rubin was just a boy from Long Island who believed in magic—music magic.

As a teen, he fronted his own garage band, and even got thrown out of the legendary CBGB’s for fighting with an audience member during one of his shows. Okay, so that audience member was actually somebody he paid to cause a scene, and the cop that threw him out was actually his father acting as a cop, and the whole fight turned out to be staged in order to build a buzz about the band, but still. That’s vision.

After borrowing $5,000 from his parents, Rubin started Def Jam Records in his NYU dorm room alongside Russell Simmons. It was in that exact room that Rubin produced chart-topping albums such as the Beastie Boys “Licensed To Ill” and gave LL Cool J his first radio hit. After parting ways with Simmons and Def Jam, Rubin founded Def American Recordings. However, after realizing that the term “Def” was becoming too mainstream he changed the name to American Recordings. He even held a traditional funeral for the nixed term, with a eulogy performed by Reverend Al Sharpton.

The former co-president of Columbia records is responsible for helping revive Johnny Cash’s career with the album “Unchained” and even helped Andrew Dice Clay drop his first comedy album. Rubin, who admittedly has no technical skills and does not know how to work a soundboard, bases his success on the fact that he listens to the music as a fan. He’s even lent his talented ear to artists like Adele, The Dixie Chicks, Jay-Z, and The Red Hot Chili Peppers, producing hit after hit. Although Rubin rarely mingles with the media and prefers to stay behind the scenes, you can catch a glimpse of him and his infamous facial hair on screen in Jay-Z’s “99 Problems” video. Clearly, if Rubin does have 99 problems, a beard ain’t one.

HeadlinesandHeroes 

Yale Student held at Gunpoint

The columnist Charles M. Blow of the New York Times has sparked debate this week by his disclosure that his son, a student at Yale College, was stopped at gunpoint by a Yale police officer who said he resembled a robbery suspect.

I’d like to take a moment to add my small coda of personal outrage, as the father of an African-American son ... who was also harassed by the Yale police while a student at Yale College. What happened to our son wasn’t as serious as what happened to Blow’s -- no gun was pointed his way -- but the echoes are painful nevertheless.

The events occurred during the summer of 2007, when “Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull” was filming at Yale. Our son was an extra in the film, and, following instructions from the producers, arrived on the set with no personal belongings. After the second day of filming, he was entering one of the residential colleges to visit a friend. A Yale police officer stopped him and questioned him. He told the officer that he was a Yale student, but of course he was carrying no identification. Up to this point, it’s fair to say that the officer had done most things right. (We’ll get to the “most” in a moment.)

Our son told the officer his name, which residential college he was in, and what his mobile phone number was. He explained why he was not carrying any identification. The officer openly disbelieved him -- but that wasn’t the end of the story.

At this point, the obvious course for the officer to follow would have been to check and determine whether a student of that name was in the college our son identified, and to either ask the master of the college or look at his photograph. The officer did neither.

Instead, the officer, a couple of days later, called the mobile phone number, evidently to get further information. As it happened, our son was in Paris, where he was preparing for a summer of study abroad. The officer asked if he could come in. He answered that he was in Paris. The officer was openly incredulous, demanding to know how it was that his phone worked abroad. Evidently, an international calling plan was somehow impossible to imagine.

My wife had gone to Paris with our son to help him get settled. At that point, she got on the phone and gave the officer a piece of her mind. I was in San Francisco, on a book tour. When I heard the story, I called the officer’s supervisor, and then had a conversation with the supervisor’s supervisor. Later, I spoke to the master of our son’s residential college, and received assurances from the office of the secretary of the university, who supervises the Yale police, that there would be no record of any kind of the encounter -- no bad mark, that is, on our son’s name.

At this point a reader might reasonably ask what makes my wife and myself think race had anything to do with our son being stopped. Fair question -- as long as you are willing to imagine that every young person who tries to enter a Yale residential college during the summer is stopped by the campus police and asked for identification.

In fact, that wasn’t even our son’s only run-in with authority at Yale. Once, leaving the bookstore, he set off an alarm, because he had in his backpack a book he’d bought there earlier. He was stopped by store security. It was entirely proper for store security to stop him -- except that he, and I too, have seen literally scores of white students set off the alarm and be ignored, or waved through without questions being asked.

Our son has gone on and prospered. We’d thought these incidents in the past. But Charles Blow’s story of his own son’s far more serious mistreatment reminded us afresh of the pain and worry.

Critics of Blow’s tale have asked how he knows race was involved, or why he didn’t mention that the officer who stopped his son is black, or whether he was asserting in his column that his son should not have been stopped because he’s the educated son of professional parents. This sort of nitpicking misses the larger point. Young black men remain objects of suspicion. That’s the simple fact of the matter. Argue if you like about the reasons, but there’s no escaping the underlying reality.

I won’t deny that policing is more art than science, and that those who do that difficult work often don’t get the credit and support that they deserve. But police officers are trapped in the same web of racial history and complexity as everyone else, and as long as the web survives, these incidents will continue to arise.

As a parent you do what you can to teach and train, you provide an education, you launch your children on what you hope will be a successful and ethical life. But the moments of interaction between black men and the police remain always fraught, and no demonstrations or television specials or reassurances from college administrators are going to change that any time soon.

Via: BloombergReview

 

AUTHOR INTERVIEW W/ THE ART XHIBITION

My name is Kewalnam Christ, I’m a creative born in Toronto, Canada and raised in Brooklyn NY. I studied art at Cooper union but besides that, I am not an college student. 

  Check out the interview below! Q: Who are your muses/inspirations in literature? A: Kewalnam "You want to know something funny, I’m not really a fan of a lot of authors. My love for literature and the ability to create an entire universe with words came from Hip-hop. Def Poetry Jam, Krs-One, Rakim & Eric B, the way old school artist would scribble scriptures on concrete walls, leaving their words eternal. Hov, Nas, Ye, Andre 3000. I feel as though a lot of writers/authors today write in a 2 dimensional-western fashion, that doesn’t suit me. I always found my love of words through sounds and visuals. Words are sounds and visuals, and when you communicate through that medium you end up creating something that’s 4th dimensional and can live on its own. However there are authors I admire that have had a huge impact on me. In other ways, like Amiri Baraka, Octavia Butler, Mark Twain, Richard Wright, & Andre Breton. “ Q: What milestones have you reached thus far with your writing?  A: Kewalnam "I released a novel last year, that did better than anything I’ve written prior. I’ve written books since I was 16, I’m 23 now, and with each one I’ve pushed myself in both storytelling and the story itself. With the novel I released last year, LILYRED, I not only sold more copies than I thought I was going to, but I received rave reviews comparing my art to the likes of Aleister Crowely & Austin Osman-Spare. I was able to get my work in front of everyone from Erykah Badu to Jay Electronica, to a few fashion big wigs, and was even invited to Forbes 30under30 summit, 2014 was enlightening for me." Q: What are 3-5 goals you have yet to accomplish with your writing? A: Kewalnam "As a writer, I want to continue to push myself, to get better and better. To write 4 dimensionally, and so far, I’ve been doing pretty good, and getting better daily. With this novel, I’m currently working on, the mission is to shift the perception of black literature and film. We receive a bad rap as black creatives, and that’s due to the art we produce and the state of racism we’re in. We don’t always push ourselves which in turn creates 2 dimensional art, when we are so much more underneath, I’m here to change that.  In studying the history of literature and our involvement in it, I’ve learned that we have not received the respect we deserve as black writers. Not one of our books have made it on the top 100 bestsellers of all time, and we continue to be marginalized in these categories of, ghetto books and erotic stories. We are more than that as a people, and as an author it is my goal to write stories that pushes the psychology of our people, until we revolt and evolve. Through stories of love and evolution that depicts our broken psychology and the beauty of what we could be. Some authors are content, with having a bestseller for a week, I want to go down in history as one of the greatest writers of my generation, that’s the mission.” In terms of the eBook…

 

Check out the interview below!

Q: Who are your muses/inspirations in literature?

A: Kewalnam

"You want to know something funny, I’m not really a fan of a lot of authors. My love for literature and the ability to create an entire universe with words came from Hip-hop. Def Poetry Jam, Krs-One, Rakim & Eric B, the way old school artist would scribble scriptures on concrete walls, leaving their words eternal. Hov, Nas, Ye, Andre 3000. I feel as though a lot of writers/authors today write in a 2 dimensional-western fashion, that doesn’t suit me. I always found my love of words through sounds and visuals. Words are sounds and visuals, and when you communicate through that medium you end up creating something that’s 4th dimensional and can live on its own.

However there are authors I admire that have had a huge impact on me. In other ways, like Amiri Baraka, Octavia Butler, Mark Twain, Richard Wright, & Andre Breton. “

Q: What milestones have you reached thus far with your writing? 

A: Kewalnam

"I released a novel last year, that did better than anything I’ve written prior. I’ve written books since I was 16, I’m 23 now, and with each one I’ve pushed myself in both storytelling and the story itself. With the novel I released last year, LILYRED, I not only sold more copies than I thought I was going to, but I received rave reviews comparing my art to the likes of Aleister Crowely & Austin Osman-Spare. I was able to get my work in front of everyone from Erykah Badu to Jay Electronica, to a few fashion big wigs, and was even invited to Forbes 30under30 summit, 2014 was enlightening for me."

Q: What are 3-5 goals you have yet to accomplish with your writing?

A: Kewalnam

"As a writer, I want to continue to push myself, to get better and better. To write 4 dimensionally, and so far, I’ve been doing pretty good, and getting better daily. With this novel, I’m currently working on, the mission is to shift the perception of black literature and film. We receive a bad rap as black creatives, and that’s due to the art we produce and the state of racism we’re in. We don’t always push ourselves which in turn creates 2 dimensional art, when we are so much more underneath, I’m here to change that. 

In studying the history of literature and our involvement in it, I’ve learned that we have not received the respect we deserve as black writers. Not one of our books have made it on the top 100 bestsellers of all time, and we continue to be marginalized in these categories of, ghetto books and erotic stories. We are more than that as a people, and as an author it is my goal to write stories that pushes the psychology of our people, until we revolt and evolve. Through stories of love and evolution that depicts our broken psychology and the beauty of what we could be. Some authors are content, with having a bestseller for a week, I want to go down in history as one of the greatest writers of my generation, that’s the mission.”

In terms of the eBook…

  Q: Describe your creative process when creating your stories. A: Kewalnam "My creative process is quite chaotic, it starts with an idea for a story, and then spawns into months and months of research. When coming up with a story, I tend to hear the sound of it first, like an album, it plays in my head, and then I start doing research on music that supports the story. After that I tend to find an album that mirrors the sounds in my head, and frame the story around that. Then I watch literally a ton of movies, research articles, TED talk speeches, and other books that talk about what, I’m writing. Then months later, we begin, the atmosphere is normally filled with music, weed, interviews playing from my favorite creatives, and a film that pertains to the story. Like I said, quite chaotic."   Q: What inspired the story line for your writing? A: Kewalnam "Life really, all thats been happening in terms of feminism and our black social issues. I wanted to tell a story that empowers women, and punches our Kings in the chest, calling all of us to man up, something deep and psychological that effects both the heart and the brain." Q: When is the book supposed to be released? A: Kewalnam "We have a date, that were going to release in February." Q: What is in store for your readers to look forward to? A: Kewalnam “http://www.youniversoulinc.com/, wait on it.”

 

Q: Describe your creative process when creating your stories.

A: Kewalnam

"My creative process is quite chaotic, it starts with an idea for a story, and then spawns into months and months of research. When coming up with a story, I tend to hear the sound of it first, like an album, it plays in my head, and then I start doing research on music that supports the story. After that I tend to find an album that mirrors the sounds in my head, and frame the story around that. Then I watch literally a ton of movies, research articles, TED talk speeches, and other books that talk about what, I’m writing. Then months later, we begin, the atmosphere is normally filled with music, weed, interviews playing from my favorite creatives, and a film that pertains to the story. Like I said, quite chaotic."

 

Q: What inspired the story line for your writing?

A: Kewalnam

"Life really, all thats been happening in terms of feminism and our black social issues. I wanted to tell a story that empowers women, and punches our Kings in the chest, calling all of us to man up, something deep and psychological that effects both the heart and the brain."

Q: When is the book supposed to be released?

A: Kewalnam

"We have a date, that were going to release in February."

Q: What is in store for your readers to look forward to?

A: Kewalnam

http://www.youniversoulinc.com/, wait on it.”

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